Conservation over a decade

In central Idaho, the Pioneer Mountain Region straddles sagebrush grasslands and high mountains. This wild and beautiful landscape hosts abundant wildlife, including sage grouse, pronghorn and antelope.

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A partnership between landowners and land trusts in the Pioneer Mountains of central Idaho has protected nearly 100,000 acres in the wildlife-rich region. / Photo courtesy of Wood River Land Trust

Returning ancestral lands

At the heart of one of California’s most scenic stretches of coastline in Big Sur, the Esselen Tribe of Monterey County has regained its first ancestral homelands since it was displaced by the Spanish four centuries ago.

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Lupines bloom on Adler Range in Big Sur, California. Western Rivers Conservancy purchased the historic property and returned it to the Esselen Tribe. / Photo by Doug Steakley

A natural stage

The pandemic dramatically changed how we interact with the world. When many arts organizations cancelled their 2020 seasons, Philadelphia contemporary ballet company BalletX found a creative way to make the world its stage.

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Dancer Ashley Simpson poses in front of a curtain of wildflowers, stretching upward before bursting into a fluid dance in the summer sunshine. / Photo by Mae Axelrod
March 15, 2021
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Grants to support climate actions

Land trusts are increasingly thinking about climate change — and how they can be part of the solution.

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Image by athree23 from Pixabay
March 10, 2021
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Helping a community recover

When a massive derecho storm hit central Iowa without warning last August, the destruction was widespread. The intense windstorm brought up to 130-mile-per-hour gusts, equivalent to a Category 3 hurricane or 40-mile-wide tornado.

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Mariel Lutz, an AmeriCorps Stewardship Technician with Bur Oak Tand Trust, and a Bur Oak crew spent three weeks in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, clearing downed trees and other organic debris left behind after a derecho. / Photo by Sarah Lawinger, Bur Oak Land Trust
March 02, 2021
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Re: Climate (2021.02)

Climate change has — and will — play an increasing role in the decline of ecosystems and our natural environment. Some may say this is an unfortunate-but-unavoidable consequence of human economic development.

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Image by marcelkessler from Pixabay
February 26, 2021
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Mapping Black history

Historically, accounts of the Chesapeake Bay watershed have too regularly excluded Black voices and narratives. This 400-year omission affects how and where conservation takes place.

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Watermen culling oysters. / Photo courtesy of The Mariners' Museum and Park
February 22, 2021
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Fresh food for the community

In many ways, the pandemic laid bare the critical connection between conservation and community access to local food.

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The Land Conservancy of New Jersey’s community garden was more popular than ever in 2020. / Photo courtesy of The Land Conservancy of New Jersey
February 17, 2021
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Tools for success

As a child, I was obsessed with the Little Tikes Workshop. Made to resemble a real-life workbench, this playset came with all the necessary fixings: a plastic hammer, drawers to hold big faux-nails and even a fake phone to handle "customer" requests.

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Before he became ambassador program manager for the Land Trust Alliance, a young Robert Schwartz was Mr. Fixit. / Photo courtesy of Robert Schwartz
February 12, 2021
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Tips for your Rally 2021 proposal

While we don't yet know what form Rally 2021 will take — though we should have clarity soon! — we do know that Rally will continue to offer cutting-edge, relevant and challenging content for the land conservation community. But we can't do it without your help.

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Downtown Cleveland and the shore of Lake Erie. / Photo by David Liam Kyle, courtesy of Western Reserve Land Conservancy
February 08, 2021
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