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Farrow Family Protects Farm in Collegedale

TN - Years ago on Tallant Road in Collegedale, there was little but the Farrow family and a few farms dotted with cows. Today, the Farrow family remains – but with a lot fewer cows. Much of that pastureland has been replaced by subdivisions in this rapidly growing area of Hamilton County. But a Collegedale businessman has found a way to keep his family farm around and add to the character of the area.
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Farrow Family Protects Farm in Collegedale

The Farrow Family Farm

Years ago on Tallant Road in Collegedale, there was little but the Farrow family and a few farms dotted with cows. Today, the Farrow family remains – but with a lot fewer cows. Much of that pastureland has been replaced by subdivisions in this rapidly growing area of Hamilton County. But a Collegedale businessman has found a way to keep his family farm around and add to the character of the area.

Franklin Farrow’s parents moved out here 25 years ago, and Mr. Farrow was raised in the area, graduating from nearby Southern Adventist University. “Immediately surrounding our home, there were many open fields and mostly cattle and pasture land. In the last 15 years, a lot of that land has been turned into subdivisions and smaller home sites,” Mr. Farrow said. In 2006, as the area continued to boom, he bought a Collegedale farm and settled there with his wife Tamatha and two children. To protect his farm and retain some of the area’s longtime rural appeal, Mr. Farrow recently completed a voluntary conservation agreement on his land with The Land Trust for Tennessee.

“I grew up across the street from my farm and my parents still live there,” Mr. Farrow said. “I moved onto 5.5 acres beside this farm in 1993 and built a home to begin raising my own family. When this farm became available, I rushed to buy the land because of rumors about it being subdivided by a local developer. I could not bear the thought of seeing it developed so close to my parent’s home and now my own home. I saw firsthand the effects of development and its impact on the land and history we take for granted.”

Tricia King, the head of The Land Trust for Tennessee’s Southeast Region office in Chattanooga, worked with the Farrow family on the conservation easement. “The decision by Franklin and his family to conserve these acres is important when you see the rapid growth of the Collegedale area,” Tricia said. “To preserve open space and wooded wildlife habitat here achieves the type of balance that many are seeking as our region continues to attract development.” Mr. Farrow’s property adjoins Grindstone Mountain, a place where he and his family enjoy walking and hiking. He hopes to see all the land in the surrounding area conserved. “We have more to do. I am encouraging neighbors to consider preserving their land for future generations,” Mr. Farrow said.

Story and photo by Tricia King, Southeast Region Project Manager, The Land Trust for Tennessee.

The Land Trust for Tennessee’s mission is to preserve the unique character of Tennessee’s natural and historic landscapes and sites for future generations

July 2008 

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