Re: Climate (2018.07)

Empowering farmers to stay in business after traditional crops fail is an increasingly urgent concern in an age of rising seas.

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Salt water intrusion in Somerset County, Maryland. / Photo by Dani Weissman, University of Maryland

Darkness worth protecting

Over 80 percent of the U.S. population lives under skies so polluted by man-made lights that celestial objects like the Milky Way are almost invisible.

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Photo by Ronald Gleason

Conserved lands provide clues to scientists

In 1978, during low tide in the Columbia River Estuary, amateur paleontologists exploring the tidal flats in Pacific County, Washington, found the skull and teeth of a primitive whale dating back 25 million years to the Oligocene, a geological epoch.

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A crab fossil (Branchioplax washingtoniana). / Photo by Sarah Richard

Food for Flight supports pollinators

Habitat restoration is a goal of many land trusts, including Three Valley Conservation Trust in Oxford, Ohio.

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High school students attend a briefing on pollinators at a Three Valley Conservation Trust habitat restoration partner's site before they begin planting milkweed and nectar plants. / Photo by Dirk Morgan

Survey says…

Americans feel significantly differently about land trusts and land conservancies, a new survey reveals.

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Americans feel significantly differently about land trusts and land conservancies, a new survey reveals. / Photo by pixabay.com/andibreit
April 02, 2018
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Land trusts can help protect pollinators

The monarch butterfly and its spectacular 3,000-mile migration — from Mexico, throughout the American Midwest, to Canada — is in great jeopardy.

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A monarch butterfly on a milkweed plant in northern Ohio. / Photo courtesy of Pollinator Partnership
February 05, 2018
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High-tech way to see a swamp

The accredited Columbia Land Trust flew a drone over a swamp restoration project and got a lot more information than it could have collected by sending its stewardship staff wading and clambering through the wet terrain.

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Aerial imagery from a UAV flight shows channels created in 2014
March 16, 2017
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Mapping America’s opinions on climate change

Many land trusts struggle with how to communicate about climate change in the communities they serve.

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Courtesy of Yale Program on Climate Change Communication
March 15, 2017
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Conserving nature in an era of changing climate

A new guide gives land trusts the tools and tips to harness climate resiliency data for lasting, on-the-ground land protection.

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Abigail Weinberg of the Open Space Institute visits Mosiers Knob, one of a limited number of steep-sloped open rock areas where the native prickly pear cactus occurs in the Pocono Mountains / Photo by Brett Cole, courtesy OSI
October 25, 2016
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Catch new fans with Pokémon Go

Pokémon Go, the insanely popular mobile game that’s motivating people to physically explore the outside world, represents a grand opportunity for land trusts.

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Pokemon Go encourages players to explore the outdoors / Photo by Josh Lynsen
August 02, 2016
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Collecting data, growing passion

The McDowell Sonoran Conservancy has one scientist on its staff, ecologist Melanie Tluczek. Yet the organization conducts extensive research on the 30,200-acre desert preserve that it helps manage north of Phoenix. How does the organization do so much research?

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Citizen scientists work with a partner scientist from the Arizona Geological Survey to map milky quartz deposits in the McDowell Sonoran Preserve/© Marianne Jensen
September 15, 2015
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Pieces of a puzzle: Why art and science matter to conservation

As both an artist and a scientist people sometimes ask me, “How does art affect your views on science?” or “Does science find its way into your art?” The simple answer is that the boundary between them is porous.

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Justin Robinson
September 08, 2015
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Version 4.0

Welcome to the fourth major version of the Land Trust Alliance’s web presence! Our first major overhaul since 2008 introduces several improvements, including this new blog, The Dirt. But to fully appreciate all that has changed, join us in the Wayback Machine.

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Land Trust Alliance website circa 2002